Todd Kuiken and Jesse Sullivan, Mind and Body

As director at the Neural Engineering Center for Artificial Limbs at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Dr. Todd Kuiken has found both a partner and a patient in Jesse Sullivan – a double amputee who has become the world's first bionic man.

This presentation at Pop!Tech shows Jesse as he is: a remarkable man, possessing the patience of Job and a remarkable spirit.

Dr. Todd Kuiken is the Director of the Neural Engineering Center for Artificial Limbs at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. The Center focuses on improving the function of artificial arms using neural integration techniques.

Todd's research interests include improving the care of amputees, the control of artificial limbs, the study of bioelectromagnetics, prosthetic design & development, and wheelchair mobility systems. He is an Associate Professor in the Dept. of PM&R and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs representing the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago in Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. He is an active clinician and the Director of Amputee Services at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. His clinical activity is focused on the care of people with amputation.

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Todd received a B.S. degree in biomedical engineering from Duke University, a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Northwestern University, and his M.D. from Northwestern University Medical School. He was the Frankel Research Fellow at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago in 1992.

http://www.ric.org/search/kuiken.php
http://www.smpp.northwestern.edu/Kuiken.htm

A resident of Dayton, Tennessee for his whole life, Jesse Sullivan worked for the city's Electric Department for twenty five years. He was seriously injured on the job on May 9th, 2001. Working with Dr. Todd Kuiken and a team at the Rehabilitation Center in Chicago, he has been involved in a major breakthrough in prosthetic technology.

Jesse lives with his wife of 21 years, and family (including six children and nine grandchildren) in Dayton. Before his accident, Jesse enjoyed fishing, hunting, camping and some farming -- things he hopes to be able to do again soon.